Almost every business out there is trying to get more of at least one of these things: time and money — and often both.

Unfortunately, both are finite resources. Spending more time on one thing means you have less to spend on another, and usually both need attention. That’s where the cloud comes in. It’s a little bit magic (okay, it’s just science). With the cloud, you can get more time and more money for, say, growing your business — and spend less time and less money on things like your billing system without negatively impacting their performance.  

Let’s break down some of the reasons cloud migration is a great investment.

  • You’ll need less infrastructure and space

 Right now you’re operating a datacenter (or two). You pay for  the hardware in the datacenters, the space where they’re housed, the staff to operate them. And every time you grow, you need to create more developer environments, more test environments, more QA environments. You have to allocate more space for new team members and increased infrastructure.

A move to the cloud means a drastic reduction in the space and hardware you need to operate your business. All of that infrastructure you’ve been managing now exists in the cloud.

  • You’ll have greater flexibility

Along with that lack of infrastructure comes greater flexibility. Under your current model, you have to purchase more hardware and spend time re-developing your existing on-premises systems to handle new growth. But when you move to the cloud, your cloud provider does all of that for you.

Why? Because systems in the cloud are automatically scalable.

If you have 50 users today, and 60 users tomorrow, the cloud will automatically scale the system to fit that need. If you drop down to 40 the next day, it will reduce the load for that as well.

  • You’ll be able to spend more time on your services or products

Stop for a moment and ask yourself what the primary purpose of your business is. The answer probably isn’t “managing our datacenters” or “upgrading our billing solutions.”

No, your primary purpose is to provide that particular set of products and services to your customers that you’re known for. And you want to spend as much time as possible building and perfecting those offerings.

Managing on-premises systems for all your enterprise software takes your (and your employees’) time and energy away from growing your business.

When you move to the cloud, the cloud provider takes care of all those details, so you can focus on the reason you’re in business — providing excellence for your clients.

  • You’ll have a faster time to market

You know that bringing a new product to market is about more than just that product. You need to make sure you have the infrastructure in place to manage all those new customers, to send out more invoices, to upgrade your distribution model for a boost in sales. The backend development can take as long as the product development.

But when any of those processes are already handled in the cloud, you can easily scale up and down as you need. You build your deployment model and images once and the cloud platform will scale up or down by simple configuration.

Boom. You’re ready.

  • You’ll save money

 Anyone running an on-premises system knows that it’s not cheap. You have a large datacenter — and most likely a second datacenter for failover. And each of those needs to be upgraded periodically, requires that you own or lease a facility to house it, and has a team of staff that have to be managed and trained.

When you migrate to the cloud, you can say goodbye to datacenters — to the cost of the infrastructure, the updates, the trainings, and the personnel. Your cloud service provider now handles everything that was on your plate before.

You can take the money you save and feed it back into your business.

Doing business in the cloud provides you the flexibility and the cost-savings to put your time and energy into the parts of your business that make you want to get up in the morning.

Ignoring the benefits of the cloud is like leaving money — and precious hours — on the table.